Victorian Liberals make no commitments to family violence reform



Georgie Crozier, Victoria’s Shadow Minister for Family Violence, stopped short of committing to the recommendations of the Royal Commission into Family Violence if the Liberals win the next state election. Ms Crozier said the Victorian Liberals would need to “talk to the experts” and consider “efficiencies” in future action on family violence.

Natalie Hutchins, the Andrews Government’s Minister for the Prevention of Family Violence, said the Andrews Government would continue its plan to implement all 227 recommendations handed down by the commission. Huong Truong, Victorian Greens Spokesperson for Family Violence, also confirmed the Greens ongoing support for the recommendations.

The forum’s keynote speaker Rosie Batty spoke tearfully about her public stance against family violence “Everyday for five years I have spoken to everyone, advocating for the end of family violence so Luke will not have died in vain.”

Ms Batty also called for governments to make this a priority. “Cut out the word ‘family’, cut out the word ‘domestic’ – this is just violence. And let’s call it what it is. It’s terrorism,” she said.

So far, 90 of the 227 recommendations have been fully or partially implemented. Minister Hutchins said the implementation was “always going to be challenging” because the government wide commitment to addressing family violence involved seven different government departments and hundreds of public servants. “It’s not easy to drive the sort of massive change that’s required. I can honestly say there is barely an agency or a department that doesn’t have responsibility on this. It really is a whole of government response”.

Minister Hutchins also announced that the Andrews Government would give an additional $6.5 million in funding to support, the new Aboriginal 10 Year Family Violence Agreement.

Ms Crozier reiterated Matthew Guy’s previous commitment about mandatory sentencing for family violence offenders, insisting it was essential to keeping women safe despite concerns from the family violence sector that it might discourage reporting. Asked about further strategies on prevention, Ms Crozier mentioned Clare’s Law, where women can access their partner’s previous family violence history and said she would want to “consult with the experts” before committing to any funding or policy positions.

The forum was organised by Domestic Violence Victoria (the peak body for family violence services), in alliance with No To Violence (the peak body for men representing organisations and individuals working with men to end family violence), CASA Forum (the peak body for Victoria’s Centres Against Sexual Assault), Gen Vic (peak body for gender equity, women’s health and the prevention of violence against women) & WIRE (a free generalist information, support and referral service for women).

“It was great to have all three major parties show up to the forum, Domestic Violence Victoria CEO Fiona McCormack said. “It shows that everyone in the parliament understands family violence is still a major concern for Victorians.”

Georgie Crozier, Victoria’s Shadow Minister for Family Violence, stopped short of committing to the recommendations of the Royal Commission into Family Violence if the Liberals win the next state election. Ms Crozier said the Victorian Liberals would need to “talk to the experts” and consider “efficiencies” in future action on family violence.

Natalie Hutchins, the Andrews Government’s Minister for the Prevention of Family Violence, said the Andrews Government would continue its plan to implement all 227 recommendations handed down by the commission. Huong Truong, Victorian Greens Spokesperson for Family Violence, also confirmed the Greens ongoing support for the recommendations.

The forum’s keynote speaker Rosie Batty spoke tearfully about her public stance against family violence “Everyday for five years I have spoken to everyone, advocating for the end of family violence so Luke will not have died in vain.”

Ms Batty also called for governments to make this a priority. “Cut out the word ‘family’, cut out the word ‘domestic’ – this is just violence. And let’s call it what it is. It’s terrorism,” she said.

So far, 90 of the 227 recommendations have been fully or partially implemented. Minister Hutchins said the implementation was “always going to be challenging” because the government wide commitment to addressing family violence involved seven different government departments and hundreds of public servants. “It’s not easy to drive the sort of massive change that’s required. I can honestly say there is barely an agency or a department that doesn’t have responsibility on this. It really is a whole of government response”.

Minister Hutchins also announced that the Andrews Government would give an additional $6.5 million in funding to support, the new Aboriginal 10 Year Family Violence Agreement.

Ms Crozier reiterated Matthew Guy’s previous commitment about mandatory sentencing for family violence offenders, insisting it was essential to keeping women safe despite concerns from the family violence sector that it might discourage reporting. Asked about further strategies on prevention, Ms Crozier mentioned Clare’s Law, where women can access their partner’s previous family violence history and said she would want to “consult with the experts” before committing to any funding or policy positions.

The forum was organised by Domestic Violence Victoria (the peak body for family violence services), in alliance with No To Violence (the peak body for men representing organisations and individuals working with men to end family violence), CASA Forum (the peak body for Victoria’s Centres Against Sexual Assault), Gen Vic (peak body for gender equity, women’s health and the prevention of violence against women) & WIRE (a free generalist information, support and referral service for women).

“It was great to have all three major parties show up to the forum, Domestic Violence Victoria CEO Fiona McCormack said. “It shows that everyone in the parliament understands family violence is still a major concern for Victorians.”

“We were pleased to have confirmation of Labor and the Greens ongoing commitment to implementing all the recommendations from the Royal Commission, but we were disappointed we couldn’t get the same from the Liberal party. We implore the Liberals to reconsider their stance.”

“After the Royal Commission, Victoria has such a sophisticated understanding of family violence that we don’t need to follow any other jurisdiction – they’re following us. It was very clear at the COAG conference last week that Victoria is taking the lead on this issue. We need to keep building on all the good work we’ve already done by following the royal commission’s roadmap.”

“We were pleased to have confirmation of Labor and the Greens ongoing commitment to implementing all the recommendations from the Royal Commission, but we were disappointed we couldn’t get the same from the Liberal party. We implore the Liberals to reconsider their stance.”

“After the Royal Commission, Victoria has such a sophisticated understanding of family violence that we don’t need to follow any other jurisdiction – they’re following us. It was very clear at the COAG conference last week that Victoria is taking the lead on this issue. We need to keep building on all the good work we’ve already done by following the Royal Commission’s roadmap.”